Visual Communication (Graphic Design)

Visual Communication (Graphic Design)


University Of Tehran
Kish International Campus

Master Program in

Visual Communication (Graphic Design)

Introduction

The Master degree program in Visual Communication (Graphic Design) draw on a strong foundation in the fine arts and a deep understanding of social and cultural influences on visual communication. Graphic design is an interdisciplinary field. The most successful graphic designers are excellent communicators, have strong empathy for others' needs and ideas, and complete their work efficiently and in a timely manner. Graphic designers develop visual ideas and turn them into digital and web-based products that educate and engage viewers. Designers may create brochures, infographics, and brand logos, and many choose a specific niche, such as education or fashion. Graphic designers may work in a variety of settings, including nonprofit organizations and major corporations.

Curriculum

The Master of Visual Communication (Graphic Design) requires completion of 32 credits, with 22 credits in the core courses and 4 credits of elective courses. The program requires completion of a thesis of 6 credits. Admitted students may need to complete a few credits of leveling courses which prepare such students for success in the Master of Visual Communication (Graphic Design), these courses do not count toward the degree. 

A minimum GPA of 14 over 20 must be maintained for graduation.

Leveling Courses (not applicable to degree)

The Masters in Visual Communication (Graphic Design) assumes a B.Sc. degree in related fields. However students holding any other undergraduate degree will be required to complete the leveling courses that are designed to provide a background for the Master courses.  These leveling courses are not counted for graduate credit towards Master degree in Visual Communication (Graphic Design).

Leveling courses: Up to 6 credits may be required

Course

Credits

Hours

Theory

Practice

Total

Theory

Practice

Total

Visual communication studio 3

1

2

3

16

64

80

Foundations of Visual Arts (1)

2

1

3

32

32

64

Foundations of Visual Arts (2)

1

2

3

16

64

80

Basic Sketching 1

-

3

3

-

96

96

Basic Sketching 2

-

3

3

-

96

96

Analysis and Assessment in Graphic Arts

2

-

2

32

-

32

 

 

Core Courses: 9 courses required, 22 credits

Course

credits

hours

Prerequisites

Theory

Practice

Total

Theory

Practice

Total

Analysis and Assessment in Graphic Arts

2

-

2

32

-

32

-

Method of Research in Visual Arts

2

-

2

32

-

32

-

Graphic and New Arts

2

-

2

32

-

32

-

Design Grammar

1

2

3

16

64

80

-

Image Idiom and Expression

1

2

3

16

64

80

-

Typography Studio

1

2

3

16

64

80

Image Idiom and Expression

Illustration in Graphic Arts

1

2

3

16

64

80

Typography Studio

Digital Graphics

-

2

2

-

64

64

-

Environmental Graphic Design Studio

-

2

2

-

64

64

-

 

Elective Courses: 4 credits required

Course

credits

hours

Presentation skills

2

48

Printing technology and Proof management

2

48

Graphic Design and Integrated Marketing

2

64

Communicology

2

48

 

Thesis: 6 credits

The research and practical work for the thesis is supervised by one or two of the department members. The thesis must be written and defended within the second calendar years after admission into the Master program. The Thesis Committee will consist of a Chair and at least two other academic referees.

 

 

Course contents

 

Analysis and Assessment in Graphic Arts

 

 

 

Content analysis of visual images

Approaches to analysis in visual design

Seeing beyond belief: Cultural Studies as an approach to analyzing the visual

Practices of seeing visual analysis: an ethno methodological approach

Analyzing Balance, Shape, Form, Space, Light, Color, Dynamics and Expression

 

References

1- Handbook of visual analysis, Theo van Leeuwen and Carey Jewitt Ed., SAGE Publications, London, 2004.

2- Art and Visual Perception, Second Edition: A Psychology of the Creative Eye, Rudolf Arnheim, University of California Press, Berkely, 2004.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research Methods in Visual Arts

 

 

 

Introduction to research in Art and Design

The research process – What? Why? How? So what?

A route map: the importance of methodology

Mapping the terrain: methods of contextualizing research

Critical thinking and response: key generic skills

Orienting and situating research

Crossing the terrain: establishing appropriate research methodologies

Methods of evaluation, analysis and interpretation

Recognizing new knowledge and communicating research findings

 

References:

  1. Visualizing Research, a Guide to the Research Process in Art and Design, Carole Gray and Julian Malins, Ashgate Publishing Limited, England, 2004.
  2. Design Studies, Theory and Research in Graphic Design, Audrey Bennett, Ed., Princeton Architectural Press, New York, 2006.

 

 

 

 

Graphic and New Arts

 

 

 

Radical art history: back to its future?

Capitalist modernity, the nation-state and visual representation

Subjects, identities, and visual ideology

Structures and meanings in art and society

Searching, after certainties

The means and ends of radical art history

Field Recordings

Adversarial Thoughts

Music for Markets

The Graphic Equalizer

Form vs. Function

Light Turning

Skilling Saws and Absorbent Catalogs

 

References:

  1. The new art history: a critical introduction / Jonathan Harris, Routledge PUBLISHER, London, 2001
  2. Volume: writings on graphic design, music, art, and culture, By Kenneth FitzGerald, 2010 Princeton Architectural Press, New York

 

 

 

 

Design Grammar

 

 

 

Space is emptiness

Symmetry and asymmetry

The historical development of space: Six Timeline

Unity and space

The seven design components

How to use the seven design components

The page as visual structure

Connecting elements and pages

Three-dimensional space

Listening to type

Typographic technicalities

Display type

Text type

 

References:

  1. The Elements of Graphic Design, Alex W. White, Allworth Press, New York, 2011
  2. Design elements: a graphic style manual: understanding the rules and knowing when to break them, Timothy Samara, Rockport Publishers, Massachusetts, 2014
  3. Universal Principles of Design, William Lidwell, Kritina Holden, Jill Butler, Rockport Publishers, Massachusetts, 2010

 

 

Image Idiom and Expression

 

 

 

Debunking the Creative Myths

Creating Purposeful Design

Achieving Order through Systems

Introducing the Design Method

Gaining Understanding: The Discovery Stage

Determining Course: The Planning Stage

Working with Ideas: The Creative Stage

Making Design Real: The Application Stage

Presenting Work to Clients

Bringing Order to Your Practice

 

References:

  1. The Design Method, A Philosophy and Process for Functional Visual Communication, Eric Karjaluoto, New Riders Publishing, USA, 2014.
  2. An Introduction to Communication Studies, Steinburg, Sheila, Cape Town, Juta and Co. 2007.

 

 

 

 

Typography Studio

 

 

 

The Evolution of Typography

The Anatomy of Typography

Legibility

The Typographic Grid

Syntax and Communication

The Typographic Message

The Evolution of Typographic Technology

Typography on Screen

Typography in Time and Motion

 

References:

  1. Typographic design: Form And Communication, Rob Carter, Philip B. Meggs, Ben Day, Sandra Maxa, Mark Sanders, 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. NewJeresy.
  2. Typographic System of Design, Elma Kimberly, Princeton Architectural Press, 2007.
  3. The Elements Of Typographic Style, Hartley & Marks Publishers, Vancouver, 2004

 

 

 

 

 

 

Illustration in Graphic Arts

 

 

 

The Conceptual Process

Brainstorming and Creative Processing

Research and Illustration

Objective and Analytical Development

Externalization of Ideas and Freedom of Expression

THE NATURE OF IMAGERY

Visual Language

Visual Intelligence

Visual Metaphor

Conceptual Imagery and Surrealism

THE ROLE OF ILLUSTRATION

Documentation, Reference and Instruction

An Overview of Illustration for Information

An Overview of Editorial Illustration

An Overview of Illustration for Narrative Fiction

Advertising Illustration in Practice 

Illustration and Design

CONTEMPORARY AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES

The Illustrator as Scientist and Cultural Historian

The Illustrator as Journalist and Commentator

The Illustrator as Author of Fiction

 

References:

  1. Illustration: A Theoretical and Contextual Perspective, Alan Male, Bloomsbury Visual Arts, 2017
  2. Sequential Images, Mark Wigan, AVA Publishing, 2008

Digital Graphics

 

 

 

PROBLEM SOLVING AND THE DIGITAL PROCESS

Computer Applications Used in Design

Software Applications for Graphics

ABSTRACTION THROUGH SIMPLIFICATION

Introduction to Abstraction

Four Basic Methods of Abstraction

Using Basic Shapes to Create the First Design

ABSTRACTION THROUGH REPETITION

Conceptual Process

Production Process

FIGURE ABSTRACTION AND NONOBJECTIVE SHAPE

DESIGN PROJECT: VALUE

DESIGN PROJECT: COLOR AND COLOR THEORY

DESIGN PROJECT: TYPE FACE DESIGN

DESIGN PROJECT: DIGITAL MONTAGE/COLLAGE

 

References:

  1. VISUAL DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS: A DIGITAL APPROACH, ALAN HASHIMOTO, MIKE CLAYTON, Course Technology PTR, Boston, 2009
  2. Digital Design, Mano Morris, Michael Ciletti, Prentice Hall, 2012

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental Graphic Design Studio

 

 

 

What Is Environmental Graphic Design (EGD)?

The Design Process Applied to EGD

Overview of the Signage Pyramid Method

The Information Content System

Pictorial Information Content

Signage Master Plans

The Graphic System

Typography Overview

Overview of Sign Graphic Application Processes

 

References:

  1. A Complete Guide to Creating Environmental Graphic Design Systems, Chris Calori, David Vanden-Eynden, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New Jersey, 2015

 

 

 

Presentation skills

 

 

 

Becoming a Skilled Presenter

Attributes of Good and Bad Presentations

Presentation Anxiety and How to Tame

Key Steps in Shaping Your Presentation

Openings and Closings in Presentation

Interaction and the Adult Attention Span

The Powerful Impact of Stories

Using (Without Misusing) PowerPoint

Preparing to Present

Presenting with Confidence

Presenting to Management

Presenting to Customers

Presenting to Your Team

Presenting at Conferences

Presenting Webinars

 

References:

  1. Presentation Skills for Technical Professional, Naomi Karten, IT Governance Publishing, Cambridge, 2010
  2. Presentation Skills Training, Christee G. Atwood, ATD Press, Alexandria, USA, 2017

 

 

 

Printing Technology and Proof Management

 

 

 

The Graphic Print Production Flow

Planning Graphic Print Production

The Computers and Communication Networks

Creating Effective Color Management

Color Management in Practice

Manipulation of Digital Images, Cameras and Scanners

Image Editing and Quality

Adjusting the Image for Printing and the Web

Layout Work

Images in Layout

Color in Layout

Typefaces, Fonts, and Typography

Proofing

Proofing and Contract Proofs

Choosing the Right Paper for Printing

Different Printing Techniques

Different Types of Finishing and Binding

 

References:

  1. A Guide to Graphic Print Production, Third Edition, Kaj Johansson, Peter Lundberg, and Robert Ryberg, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. New Jersey, 2011
  2.  Sustainable Graphic Design, Tools, Systems, and Strategies for Innovative Print Design, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 2010

 

 

Graphic Design and Integrated Marketing

 

 

 

Finding the Mission and Marketing Message

Finding Clients

Sales Strategy

Effective Promotion Materials

Portfolio Presentations

Pricing and Negotiating

Time and Stress Management

Networking Works

When is Advertising the Right Tool?

Public Relations Strategy

Direct Marketing with a Personal Touch

Marketing with your Web Site

Writing Your Marketing Plan

 

References:

  1. The Graphic Designer's Guide to Marketing, Maria Piscopo, Allworth Press, New York, 2004  
  2. Communications Writing and Design, John DiMarco, JohnWiley & Sons, NJ 07030, USA, 2017

 

 

 

Communicology: Communication Process

 

 

 

Finding Common Ground

Setting the Agenda: Focusing on What Really Matters

Clarifying Focus and Objective

Making New Ideas Salient

The Elusive Art of Meaning Making

How Language Creates Meaning

Creating Meaning with Stories

Spark the Action You Want to See

Managing Fear

Managing Ambivalence

Learning from Feedback: It's Not Over ‘til it's over

 

References:

  1. Breakthrough Communication, Harrison Monarth, McGraw-Hill Education, 2014
  2. Technical Communication: Process and Product, Seventh Edition, Sharon J. Gerson and Steven M. Gerson. Prentice Hall, 2012